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Library DIY

Navigating UWG library resources and research

Where to search

Deciding where to search 

What type(s) of sources might you need? 

Does your assignment recommend certain source types (e.g. peer-reviewed articles, newspaper articles, data, books, videos)? What role do sources play in the project? 

Depending on the topic, you might look for books, articles, media coverage, or other online sources.  If your topic is very new, there may not be many books or scholarly articles because scholarly works can have a long publication process.

Who has written on/discussed your topic? 

A topic like "race relations in prisons" might be explored by scholars in sociology, law, criminal justice, public policy, psychology, or ethnic studies. Search by discipline or your academic field by using the databases and other library resources recommended in the Subject Guides. If you aren't certain which field to pick, consider which department would offer a class about the issue.

Locating sources

Books: Search the UWG Library Catalog. For help finding books, visit Finding Books on Your Topic.

Articles: Library databases provide access to many scholarly articles. The Multi-Search feature on the Databases & GALILEO page (also on the library's homepage) allows you to simultaneously search the library catalog plus about 130 of the more than 400 databases that Ingram Library subscribes to. Once you have done a search you can limit the results to scholarly articles by choosing "Academic Journals" (under Type).

General databases like Academic Search Complete also contain scholarly, popular, and professional journal articles from most disciplines. This is also a good place to start your research.

More Library Databases

Subject-Specific Research: Browse the Subject Guides or Course Guides for more specialized resources. For more guidance look at Finding Peer-Reviewed Articles.

Newspaper Sources: Go to our newspaper databases.

Looking for data?  Explore databases that contain statistics. Or search Google for data on your topic. Search for "[your topic] statistics" or "[your topic] data."

Government Information: 

Still not sure where to search? Click on Live Chat on the Library's homepage.