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Georgia Political Papers and Oral History Program

The Georgia Political Papers and Oral History Program is comprised of over 3,000 linear feet of archival collections, along with an extensive number of oral history interviews, that document the unique political culture of the state of Georgia.

John Linder

John Linder was born on September 9, 1942 in Deer River, Minnesota, went to schools in that state, and graduated with a dentistry degree from the University of Minnesota in 1967. He served in the United States Air Force from 1967-1969, after which he moved to Duluth, Georgia to begin a private dental practice. Linder was the Republican representative for the 44th District and served seven terms in the Georgia House (1975-1980, 1983-1990). In 1992, he was elected to serve the 7th U.S. Congressional District. He serves on the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, and his major issue is tax reform, about which he has co-written a book. In November of 2008, Linder will be running for his ninth term in Congress.; Interviewed by Mel Steely on December 10, 1996 in John Linder's home.; Linder begins the interview by talking about his life growing up and going to college in Minnesota. One of the more interesting anecdotes that Linder discusses involves an agreement made with Speaker Tom Murphy that Murphy went back on his word on, which highly disappointed Linder. He then states that Murphy never missed an opportunity to be "petty." After a brief discussion about Tom Murphy's relationship with other politicians, Linder answers questions about his 1982 race. He talks about his time in Congress, including his committees, campaigning tactics, and how he went about getting bills on the floor. The rest of the interview deals mainly with partisan politics and its effect on the government, especially in Georgia. The interview cuts off at the end of the 2nd disc.